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Tag Archives: special operators

Pints for Patriots

Patriotic craft breweries across the nation are banding together during this November to salute our Veterans and support the mission of The Honor Foundation.

If you would like to learn more about how you can participate in this campaign as a brewery or an individual, contact Renee Booth at renee@honor.org.

Matching opportunities are welcome!
Wrightsville Beach Brewery
Campaign Founders

THF’s J.P. Tuthill Featured on The Philanthropy United Podcast

Listen to THF’s Director of Impact, J.P. Tuthill, on The Philanthropy United Podcast share the mission of The Honor Foundation and how he found fulfillment after his own career as a U.S. Army Green Beret.

Thank you for sharing your time with us, The Philanthropy United! Visit the link below to listen to J.P.’s full episode.

 

https://www.philanthropyunited.com/podcast

THF Dallas Event Featured in Bubble Life

Plano Fundraiser Connects Local Veterans with National Military Transition Organization

Michelle Buckalew – Guest Contributor

The Honor Foundation, a military career transition organization that serves U.S. Special Operations Forces, and Surefox North America, a local veteran-owned and operated security consulting firm, were proud to host local veterans and Plano City Council Member Rick Grady for an exclusive fundraiser and networking event at Haywire Plano on May 12.

Honored guests of the evening also included graduates of The Honor Foundation’s transition program which helps special operations veterans translate their military service to careers in the private sector. Its nationally recognized curriculum combines one-on-one executive coaching and industry mentoring as well as access to an elite, nationwide professional network.

The event was sponsored by Surefox.  About 80% of the company’s employees are veterans.

“The Honor Foundation and Surefox North America share the same values and the same vision to help our veterans transition to civilian life,” said Brian Sweigart, Surefox Co-Founder and Chief Operating Officer. “We both provide veterans a safe place to learn and grow alongside other veterans who understand the challenges, and we empower them to succeed by placing them in positions where their unique skills and expertise are valued.”

“The Honor Foundation helps our Special Ops Forces transition through one of the most difficult times of their lives and find fulfillment after the military,” said Matt Stevens, THF Chief Executive Officer. “We are grateful to have a partner like Surefox support us so we can continue to help veterans. Our goal is to make sure their next mission is always clear.”

91% of Special Operators feel transition out of the military is more difficult than combat deployment and being separated from family. Vietnam veteran and Plano City Council Member Rick Grady says it’s important that veterans receive support and training to help them integrate back into civilian life.

“Military transition programs like this are critical to our veteran community. For many veterans, returning to civilian life can be like going to a foreign country. They don’t know where they are going to live, how to build a resume, or how to find a job.  That’s why so many veterans end up homeless,” said Grady. “I hope that more corporations will see the incredible value and skillset our veterans offer and welcome them into their organizations.”

Since 2014, more than 1,500 veterans have graduated from The Honor Foundation’s career transition program.

 

Find the full article HERE as featured on:

Plano Bubble Life

Preston Hollow Bubble Life

Addison Bubble Life

Garland Bubble Lie

Lakewood/East Dallas Bubble Life

 

Swim for SOF on 10News

THF’s Swim for SOF on ABC 10News!

The Honor Foundation’s Swim for SOF event on September 18 is a high-performance athletic challenge that will raise awareness and funds for transitioning members of the Special Operations Forces community.

This event is the first of its kind in San Diego and will feature a 3.3-mile open swim, push-ups, pull-ups, a ceremony at the USS Midway Museum and after-party at the Intercontinental San Diego.

Visit the link to view the full clip!

THF Featured on SOFcast Podcast

“Transition is a layered approach and it certainly depends on all the factors like your job, your deployments — things like that. Whatever you do, you have to make sure you have an offramp and not a cliff. You don’t want to come to the cliff and fall off. You want to walk down the ramp and have a smooth landing…” — Matt Stevens

Listen to THF CEO Matt Stevens, SEAL (ret.), and VP of Operations, Michael Halterman, Marine Raider (ret.), share their challenges of transitioning from the world of Special Operations to the civilian sector on the official USSOCOM podcast, SOFcast.

Click to listen to the full interview HERE.

Matt Stevens Featured on the Everyday Coach Podcast

THF CEO Matt Stevens was recently a guest on the Everyday Coach Podcast, hosted by Harrison Bernstein, Founder of Soldiers to Sidelines.

 

 

Listen NOW:

Harrison is the Founder/Executive Director of Soldiers To Sidelines. The organization educates and certifies veterans and service members of every branch to become expert coaches. Then helps them earn coaching positions within their community.
Prior to his work with STS, Harrison has coached in the NFL with the Washington Redskins, Cleveland Browns, a football coach for High School and NCAA, an adjunct teacher of Exercise Science at George Washington University, and an entrepreneur in fitness/wellness/human performance.
Soldiers To Sidelines provides training and opportunities for military members to be excellent coaches in various sports so they will inspire, motivate, and encourage athletes.

One is None | 6.4.21

Save the date! JUNE 4, 2021 in San Diego, CA.

Join The Honor Foundation for an exclusive, once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to spend an intimate day with former U.S. Navy SEALs, EOD Technicians, Marine Raiders and other Special Operations Leaders.

Stay tuned for more details on this event!

THF Participates in Harvard Business School Case

This November, Harvard Business School published “The Honor Foundation: Accessing Special Operations Talent,” an extensive case study focusing on the THF organization and highlighting the unique skill sets of individuals from the Special Operations Forces community. Though not readily available to the public, it was reflective on the significance of integrating men and women from SOF into the workforce and the value they bring to the private sector, especially in times of crises.

“Amid a pandemic, executives are finally realizing the importance of bringing outsiders who are comfortable dealing with the unexpected onto their teams. As these crises wear on, the singular and eminently portable skills of our country’s highest-trained servicepeople are becoming more and more valuable…”

Read the summary article from Harvard Business Review, “Lessons on Leading Through Chaos from U.S. Special Operations,” for insights from several THF Alumni on how their knowledge gained from their SOF training and experiences greatly play a role in their career outside of the Teams.

 

THF Alumni Ted Handler Featured on SOFSpot Podcast

“The experiences that veterans bring to the table — I have yet to find a leadership challenge that I wasn’t able to draw a parallel to in the military. […] To the transitioning people out there, you will have the experiences to draw off of to make yourself successful.”

Tune in to Episode #49 “Comfortable in the Chaos” of SOFSpot, the podcast of the Global SOF Foundation and listen to the transition stories of THF Alumni Ted Handler along with Blake Moore and Dennis Moore.

Thank you to Chelsea Hamashin and Global SOF Foundation for the opportunity and to Ted for sharing your insight and experience.

Listen to the full episode HERE.

Victory Strategies | THF: MasterClass Series

Expand your leadership while investing in the future of transitioning U.S Special Operators!

The Honor Foundation has partnered with the Victory Strategies team for a monthly LIVE MasterClass delivered by former Fortune 500 Executives and former Military Special Operations.

100% charitable donation to THF! Sign up today to take part in a series that features 40 minutes of live wisdom followed by 20 minutes of real-time questions and responses.

Click the link below to reserve your seat now!

https://www.victory-strategies.com/store/masterclass-2020-series

THF Shout-out on Fox & Friends

Watch THF Alumni and other U.S. Special Operators swim across the Hudson River on August 8, 2020 to benefit military veterans! The clip below was captured from Fox & Friends! Extra bonus:  the THF shoutout from Kristen Seiff (check us out at the 1:13 mark)! 

Pete Swims with Navy SEALs to Support Veterans

For a second straight year, Pete joins the Navy SEALs for a swim across the Hudson River to support our nation’s heroes!

Posted by Fox & Friends on Sunday, August 9, 2020

THF on The Victory Podcast

Life. Leadership. Journey. Join Jacob Werksman, host of The Victory Podcast, for an hour of storytelling and reflection with THF CEO Matt Stevens. 

Listen to Matt’s interview (Episode 18) by visiting the link below!

https://www.victory-podcast.com/episodes

THF on High Performance Pathways Podcast

Listen to a podcast interview with Court Whitman, and his featured guest, THF CEO Matt Stevens. 

“High Performance Pathways is a purpose-built and specially selected collection of someone’s experience as they discuss how they understand, chase & discover high performance in their life. This content is collected during a One-on-One interview and then shared with you. Why? Because I believe everyone has a different pathway to high performance. And hearing about the paths that other professional’s have journeyed along is informative and inspiring.”

Visit the link to listen to the full interview and be sure to follow Court and the podcast for more insightful and inspirational stories.

Spotlight on nCino

We’re excited to introduce another valued Employer Partner of The Honor Foundation and an Alumni who is now part of their family.

These are companies and organizations who have hired men and women from our program and/or who have generously given us their time, resources and connections in an effort to help build a stronger network for our Fellows after service — a community post community. 

 

Q1  What advice do you have for those who are experiencing transition?

Mark George: This will be foreign, but as much as you can, take time to focus on yourself. Do nothing for a little while and get reacquainted with your family. When you can tell you are getting on your spouse/significant other’s nerves, then it is time to get back after it. Also, plan plenty of time for the VA. I am four months out and still trying to get everything straight. Be sure to grow and cultivate your network – when people tell you they will help (to make introductions), take them up on it.

nCino: We understand that those transitioning from military to civilian life are juggling many priorities, and we encourage those transitioning to be open and honest with their managers. It is important that they feel empowered to verbalize if they need time off or a more flexible work schedule as they adjust. We also encourage our veterans to stay connected, finding a coworker or group of coworkers who have a similar background and experience transitioning to the civilian work/life. Camaraderie is important. 

Q2  What is your favorite interview question?

MG: What sales experience do you have?

nCino: nCino’s culture is built on six core values, one of which is to “Always bring Your A-Game”.  In interviews, we love to hear how potential employees brought their A-game to a situation, or “Made someone’s Day” – another value that’s really important to our company culture. 

Q3  What similarities did you find between your role at nCino and your previous experience in the SOF community?

MG: Definitely still leading, but just in a different way.  My FID training/deployed experiences have been invaluable, especially in sales.  The ability to build rapport, cultivate relationships, and navigate the human terrain are essential skills and can’t be faked.  

Q4  What makes the culture at your company special?

MG: From my first day, everyone has bent over backwards to assist and ensure my success. The success of the individual means the success of the team and everyone bands together to make it happen.  From the top down there is a tremendous amount of transparency and communication.  In the military we talk often of “big boy/girl rules” and autonomy — nCino truly offers that.  Additionally, nCino is very philanthropically-driven, giving back non-profits and to the local community.  Each employee is encouraged use two paid days per year to volunteer and support a charity or organization of their choosing. 

nCino: We have an incredible culture at nCino, and that’s because we have incredible people who are committed to preserving it. We hire people who embody and add to our core values and who can bring something unique to the team. Our employees support and trust each other and because of that, everyone has the confidence to do their best work. 

Q5  What question are you asked more than any other?

MG: The question I get most often is “Do you miss the Marine Corps?” “Why sales?” is a close second.

Q6  What drives you everyday?

MG: I am hypercompetitive, so I try to bring my “A-game” and help the team.  This sounds cliché, but I really enjoy helping others. Particularly, those trying to help themselves – the hand-up versus the handout!

Q7  What unanticipated skills, talent, and/or competencies did you gain for employing Special Operators at your organization?

nCino: Each veteran hired to work at nCino brings a special skill set to our company. Many are outstanding leaders, they know how to manage complicated projects, can motivate other employees and have a competitive mindset that encourages their fellow coworkers to bring their A-game every day. 

Q8  What book do you find most valuable?

MG: Candide by Voltaire

Q9  What is a lesson you learned the hard way?

MG: Listen and think before you speak.

Q10  What defines a leader?

MG: One who knows who he/she is leading and tailors that leadership to the individual.  One in charge who learns individuals’ strengths and assesses the best way to maximize those strengths, task accordingly, and achieve the greatest results. 

Q11  What is your favorite quote?

MG: “I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts, and beer.”  — Abraham Lincoln 

The Honor Journal: Summer 2020

The June 2020 newsletter is here! Read to see what The Honor Foundation has been up to for the first half of the year — how THF pivoted to address COVID-19, the on-boarding of new team and board members, Spring graduations, new partnerships, fundraising campaigns, featured spotlights on Carrington Charitable Foundation and Alumni, and more!

THF_June 2020_Newsletter_Distribution

PayPal CFO John Rainey Shares His Commencement Address with Graduating Fellows

THF had the honor of having PayPal CFO John Rainey as the commencement speaker for our Group 30 Graduation. His address was timeless, thoughtful and inspiring for not only members of the Special Operations community, but for all those who will be experiencing a new career transition. Read his full post below.

https://www.linkedin.com/posts/john-rainey-pypl_classof2020-activity-6668904724516892672-zrhd

Spotlight on BD

We’re excited to introduce a new  feature to showcase our valued Employer Partners and the Alumni who are now part of their family.

These are companies and organizations who have hired men and women from our program and/or who have generously given us their time, resources and connections in an effort to help build a stronger network for our Fellows after service — a community post community. 

Q1 What advice do you have for those who are experiencing transition? 

RF:  The fear of the unknown was the hardest part of transition me. Once I mastered this fear and replaced it with excitement, I began to enjoy this time in my life. I began to look forward to what might be possible.

NB:  Start your transition at least 2 years from separating.  Utilize the DOD Skillbridge program to gain experience in whatever industry you are planning to work in.  That short stint of industry experience will make you a lot more competitive for Management level positions.  At the same time ensure you attend as many transitioning courses/programs (like THF) as possible. Start building your professional network early. Build relationships with professionals from every industry and every type of position you can think of, and always remember to be grateful and appreciative of everyone’s time and willingness to help you.  Meeting people is easy, but establishing and sustaining relationships is hard work.

Q2 What experience shaped who you are?

RF:  I spent 23 years of my life serving in the Special Operations Forces (SOF) community, US Navy SEAL Teams. I have had countless positive and negative experiences that have contributed to who I am today. The most influential experience by far is building lifelong friendships in a purpose driven community of likeminded warriors. My transition into corporate America has in large part been so successful because of my continued friendships and connections within the SOF community.  In turn have found myself looking for ways to help fellow veterans find similar success in their transitions.

NB:  My 20 years in the military, and more specifically my 16 years in Naval Special Warfare (NSW), where I deployed 7 times.  During that time I learned what adversity means, witnessed amazing (and not so amazing) leadership, and how critical effective communication is.

Q3 What is your favorite interview question?

RF:  How do you handle colleagues/teammates who are under performing or not meeting timelines? I reframe this question to ask, how can I lead my teammates in a way that brings out their best and helps them see the larger objective? I have found that most people are not under performing rather they are over tasked by multiple competing objectives. I work in a highly matrixed environment and I have found that my teammates are often balancing multiple competing demands for their time. It is my job to see the big picture and understand what is driving my teammate’s performance.  I then work to de-conflict competing objectives while doing my best to understand their functional, operational, and personal demands.

NB:  Tell me a time where you failed or did not deliver as expected?  I love this question because everyone has a ton of these experiences (although you never hear about them) which initially sounds bad because failing is never the plan.  But, lessons you learned from those failures are invaluable, how you handled the situation is critical, and how you recovered from the failure is very important. These questions showcase vulnerability, accountability, and persistence.

Q4 What are similarities did you find between your role at BD and your previous experience in the SOF community?

RF:  In my last SOF role I was the Current Operations Officer for all of the West Coast SEAL Teams. What we call operations in the SEAL Teams is similar to projects and programs at BD. In both roles I have been tasked with deploying mission-essential equipment and people to multiple global positions. In both roles I have spent weeks planning and preparing for projects that often face delays and unsurmountable obstacles but somehow still get accomplished.  In both roles I work in a highly matrixed environment. In both roles I am responsible for leading cross functional teams tasked to do more with less.

NB:  I found that communication, leadership, mentorship, people and time management are very similar.

  • Communication: In some aspects BD has better communication, and in others the military has better communication. Specifically, all the various electronic tools available at BD (Outlook, Skype messaging, Skype calls, internal social media, intranets, etc.) makes delivering information electronically easier.  The military is much better with face-to-face communication and messaging tasks, goals, and objectives in a more clear and direct way. Both face-to-face and electronic communication are important and I feel my communication abilities have increased because I now utilize both in my day to day work and communication with co-workers.
  • Leadership/ Mentorship: My co-workers at BD are very intelligent and motivated.  They are quick to identify improvement opportunities and create plans and processes to address those opportunities.  Where I feel improvements can be made, and what veterans can bring to the table is organizing available resources, clarifying objectives, prioritizing tasks, and finishing projects.  For the most part, we (veterans) are quick to step up and ensure everyone is aligned and working towards the same goals.  I tribute these abilities to the leadership experience we gain through the military. BD and the military both have very similar career development tools, employee evaluations, and mentor type of programs. ·
  • Management: Managing people, time, and resources at BD is very similar as in the military.

Q5 What makes the culture at your company special? 

RF:  I have found that BD associates reflect the BD core values: we are humble, sincere, transparent, and explicit in our intentions. At the end of the day the work we do at BD is advancing the world of health. It is easy to remember that those patients are often beloved family members.

NB:  The part of BD’s culture that stands out most to me is the emphasis on the patient.  It is easy to get wrapped around productivity, cost savings, and revenue in a large company, but BD consistently reminds us that there is a patient at the end of every device we manufacture.  Our veterans program (VETS ARG), which has been re-launched within the last year has gained a lot of momentum and is really putting emphasis on giving back to our Veterans internally within our company, and externally within the community.

Q6 What question are you asked more than any other?

RF:  How do you lead people with more industry experience than you? My answer is always be humble, ask lots of questions and complement often.

NB:  Was the transition from the military to the corporate world hard? Specifically “how do you go from an operational SEAL to a corporate employee?” My response is “I purposely found a role in the Healthcare space because although I am not the one creating medical devices or in a lab developing cures for diseases, what I am doing is contributing to saving lives and helping people.” I also respond that “The leadership and communication experience we gained through the military can be applied anywhere, especially in corporate America.”

Q7 What drives you everyday? 

RF:  I am responsible for deploying cutting edge medication management solutions to over 100 global Military Treatment Facilities (MTFs). I am driven every day to provide the military exceptional management solutions that decrease pharmacy medication cost, decrease medication diversion, and greatly improve patient safety.  Ultimately, I am proud to be able to help positively impact the health care conditions of active duty and retired members of the military, along with their dependents.

NB:  Leading and helping teams that are making an impact, and empowering those teams with a clear path to crush their objectives.  I love communicating and removing roadblocks, and knowing the team trusts me to provide top cover for them.

Q8 What book do you find most valuable? 

NB:  I find myself reviewing the Project Management Body of Knowledge (PMBOK) pretty often, on a personal level I like reviewing Simon Sinek’s “Start with Why.”  I love the concept of identifying your “Why” statement and having that guide your journey for meaningful employment. Thank you to The Honor Foundation for introducing me to this book and TED Talk.

Q9 What is a lesson you learned the hard way?

RF:  I regret not taking my health as seriously as I should have, during my transition to corporate America.  I took my health for granted by allowing work and family to take higher priority. About a year ago I hit a low point in my health that scared me into change. I have since made major improvement to my health by guarding my sleep, managing nutrition and exercising daily. This should go without saying but you have to make you a priority.

NB:  I’ve learned that over the last 18 months that Corporate America places a heavy emphasis on industry and technical experience, in some cases more so than leadership, management and communication experience.  Once someone has a “foot in the door” their leadership and communication experience can then quickly be used to identify them as a high potential, high performing associate, but even so, managers can still be hesitant to give veterans management opportunities without extensive functional experience performing the job duties of the role.

Q10 What defines a leader? 

RF:  A leader listens first, asks questions often and brings out the best in people. A leader’s optimism is contagious even in the worst situations.

NB:  A leader is someone who puts their people first.  They communicate expectations, goals, and objectives clearly.  They inspire people through accountability, empowerment, trust, and their own actions.

Q11 What is your favorite quote? 

RF:  “The quality of a person’s life is in direct proportion to their commitment to excellence, regardless of their chosen field of endeavor.” Vince Lombardi

NB:  Be a good dude (Nick Bellenbaum)