We’re excited to introduce another valued Employer Partner of The Honor Foundation and an Alumni who is now part of their family.

These are companies and organizations who have hired men and women from our program and/or who have generously given us their time, resources and connections in an effort to help build a stronger network for our Fellows after service — a community post community. 

 

Q1  What advice do you have for those who are experiencing transition?

Mark George: This will be foreign, but as much as you can, take time to focus on yourself. Do nothing for a little while and get reacquainted with your family. When you can tell you are getting on your spouse/significant other’s nerves, then it is time to get back after it. Also, plan plenty of time for the VA. I am four months out and still trying to get everything straight. Be sure to grow and cultivate your network – when people tell you they will help (to make introductions), take them up on it.

nCino: We understand that those transitioning from military to civilian life are juggling many priorities, and we encourage those transitioning to be open and honest with their managers. It is important that they feel empowered to verbalize if they need time off or a more flexible work schedule as they adjust. We also encourage our veterans to stay connected, finding a coworker or group of coworkers who have a similar background and experience transitioning to the civilian work/life. Camaraderie is important. 

Q2  What is your favorite interview question?

MG: What sales experience do you have?

nCino: nCino’s culture is built on six core values, one of which is to “Always bring Your A-Game”.  In interviews, we love to hear how potential employees brought their A-game to a situation, or “Made someone’s Day” – another value that’s really important to our company culture. 

Q3  What similarities did you find between your role at nCino and your previous experience in the SOF community?

MG: Definitely still leading, but just in a different way.  My FID training/deployed experiences have been invaluable, especially in sales.  The ability to build rapport, cultivate relationships, and navigate the human terrain are essential skills and can’t be faked.  

Q4  What makes the culture at your company special?

MG: From my first day, everyone has bent over backwards to assist and ensure my success. The success of the individual means the success of the team and everyone bands together to make it happen.  From the top down there is a tremendous amount of transparency and communication.  In the military we talk often of “big boy/girl rules” and autonomy — nCino truly offers that.  Additionally, nCino is very philanthropically-driven, giving back non-profits and to the local community.  Each employee is encouraged use two paid days per year to volunteer and support a charity or organization of their choosing. 

nCino: We have an incredible culture at nCino, and that’s because we have incredible people who are committed to preserving it. We hire people who embody and add to our core values and who can bring something unique to the team. Our employees support and trust each other and because of that, everyone has the confidence to do their best work. 

Q5  What question are you asked more than any other?

MG: The question I get most often is “Do you miss the Marine Corps?” “Why sales?” is a close second.

Q6  What drives you everyday?

MG: I am hypercompetitive, so I try to bring my “A-game” and help the team.  This sounds cliché, but I really enjoy helping others. Particularly, those trying to help themselves – the hand-up versus the handout!

Q7  What unanticipated skills, talent, and/or competencies did you gain for employing Special Operators at your organization?

nCino: Each veteran hired to work at nCino brings a special skill set to our company. Many are outstanding leaders, they know how to manage complicated projects, can motivate other employees and have a competitive mindset that encourages their fellow coworkers to bring their A-game every day. 

Q8  What book do you find most valuable?

MG: Candide by Voltaire

Q9  What is a lesson you learned the hard way?

MG: Listen and think before you speak.

Q10  What defines a leader?

MG: One who knows who he/she is leading and tailors that leadership to the individual.  One in charge who learns individuals’ strengths and assesses the best way to maximize those strengths, task accordingly, and achieve the greatest results. 

Q11  What is your favorite quote?

MG: “I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The great point is to bring them the real facts, and beer.”  — Abraham Lincoln